East Africa, Part 7: Final bit of Masai Mara.

You’ll notice I alternate between spelling Masai with one “a” and Maasai with two “a”s. It’s because it’s supposed to be Maasai but sometimes signs and documents say one or the other so I go with my mood at that moment of typing and completely disregard having some kind of system. You’ll see the same thing happen when I get to Olduvai / Oldupai Gorge.

Wrapping up the Masai Mara. Let’s start off nice and easy with some giraffes.

Always a plus to see their long prehensile tongues in action.

A vulture in a lone tree doing vulture things.

The gnu were crossing! Being that gnu are the dumbest animal in all of God’s great and glorious creations, why were they crossing? No one knows (including the gnu). Where are they going? Again, no clue all around. But there they went, going from a place to another place like they do.

A group of eland on the hill watching this cavalcade of pointlessness.

A splodge of hippos. The scientific name for a group of hippos is a pod but a splodge feels more accurate. They’re a very splodgy creature.

The importance of this splodge is actually the path to the side. It’s a path this group has carved over time to get down to the water and back and it is the path the gnu will follow when they cross the river.

Crocodiles. They’re basking in the sun and waiting for snakkies to come their way.

A herd of buffalo with killer-looking clouds in the background.

This. This is what we came to see. Thousands and thousands of gnu dotting the landscape. Tens of thousands. It’s impossible to capture it in photographs.

Storks! Not marabou storks, but still janky-looking birds so I was happy.

A mother elephant and her baby. It’s a male baby because he was flinging his trunk around and flapping his little ears because he is big strong man and you should be afraid. You could hear his weary mother be like “Yes, yes, very intimidating.”

And then they joined their herd.

Then a group of giraffes sauntered in.

And some eland. It was like someone called a meeting of the herbivores and all of them showed up.

A bird! In a tree! I honestly cannot remember what bird this was but I took some pictures of it so it had to had some significance. Please enjoy the pictures of this bird.

We drove back through the gates with the mongeese and the baboon and I didn’t see them but I did see a semi-tame eland chilling across the street. The guy brought it kitchen clippings and the eland was quite pleased. I didn’t pet it. I wanted to pet it but I didn’t want to become a cautionary tale. When you pet large animals, no matter how tame they appear, it can end real badly and all of a sudden you need a prosthetic something-or-other.

Now this bird coming up was way far away and these pictures are unfortunate but he caught something, a mouse perhaps, and he ate it in front of us so I’m putting it in even though it looks like it was taken by satellite. You can totally see him toss that rodent back.

Then we came back and I said good night for the last time to my gecko, wiped away a tear, and packed to go to the Serengeti.

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